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My (second) Drupal article has been published

After my last Drupal article in the German + international Linux Magazin(e) from early 2005, my new Drupal-related article has been published in PHP Solutions's issue 1/2006 (13).

After I was back from a short vacation without Internet access, I was surprised to see a post by Robert Douglass titled "Uwe Hermann's Drupal article in PHP Solutions is out" on the drupal.org main page. At that point I didn't even know that the article had been published ;-)

Robert wrote a short review of the article which outlines the main content. In contrast to my last article which was a general introduction to Drupal, this one concentrated on some specific (probably more advanced) topics instead: multi-site install, l10n+i18n, search engine optimization, and AJAX(-like) user interfaces of the upcoming Drupal 4.7 release.

The printed article should be available in multiple languages (German, French, Polish and Italian, at least). There might be a free online version as soon as the next issue of PHP Solutions is published, but I'm not entirely sure.

Thanks a lot to Robert Douglass for the review and to Drupal's Benevolent Dictator for Life Dries Buytaert who reviewed an early draft of my article and provided helpful suggestions!

Drupal 4.6.4 / 4.5.6 fixes three security issues

You might have already noticed, but I'll re-iterate nevertheless: the Drupal project has released Drupal 4.6.4 and 4.5.6 which fix three security vulnerabilities. Everyone running a Drupal site is advised to upgrade, as always.

Multiple people were mighty busy yesterday preparing, finalizing and testing the patches and advisories. I was one of them, although I was more like lurking around trying to look busy ;-) Anyways, I have sent the respective advisories (DRUPAL-SA-2005-007, DRUPAL-SA-2005-008, DRUPAL-SA-2005-009) to the "usual suspects" today: Bugtraq, Full Disclosure, and the php-sec mailing list. The advisories have already been picked up by Secunia and a bunch of other security sites...

Btw: I finally received news that my domain was transferred to my new web hoster today, which led to a short downtime. Everything should be fine now. If you notice any problems, please drop me a note.

Planet Drupal

A lot of people have already blogged about the new Planet Drupal. It's about time to get my act together and blog about it, too.

I have been submitting a few patches for Drupal's aggregator module recently and working closely together with Dries (Drupal's Benevolent Dictator for Life) to create the planet. He mercilessly reviewed (and applied!) my patches, commented on my ideas and suggested lots of improvements. Without him the planet wouldn't be here today.

As I already stated in the original announcement, we run the planet using Drupal, of course (dogfood etc.), and not the (otherwise quite nice) PlanetPlanet, which most other planets use.

The now improved aggregator module is capable to create a Planet site like Planet Drupal in a few minutes and mostly out-of-the-box, requiring no changes to the code. There are a few minor issues which we need to sort out, but the Planet is there now, and you can subscribe to it in any RSS feed reader.

Drupal Moved To New Servers

drupal.org has moved to new servers today. After a short downtime the site was up again and faster than ever.

Scott Kveton from the Open Source Lab at Oregon State University has more details, figures and load graphs in his blog post Drupal.org: Before and After.

As I reported earlier, Drupal asked for donations for new server hardware. And received them. Lots of them. The server move today was the first step to put that money to good use. More will follow.

Mambo Fork

Ok, so it seems the Mambo Foundation (or Miro, the company behind it) wants to take over control of the GPL'd content management system Mambo. The core developers have written an open letter to the community and want to fork the project. Slashdot reported.

Miro has now answered a few questions, see The Mambo Open Source Controversy - 20 Questions With Miro. Again, Slashdot reported.

Among the things the Mambo Foundation introduces are membership fees for 3rd party developers (US$ 1000 per year) and several penalties (even monetary) in the Terms & Conditions for developers who don't follow the rules.

Funny guys...

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