media

List of my Creative Commons licensed photos being used elsewhere

As you may know I maintain a Creative Commons licensed photoblog at my website. I'm also cross-posting some of the better photos to my flickr page.

Even with my humble, and not really widely-known little photoblog, you can already see the Creative Commons license's effects on media sharing and remixing/reusing kick in. Quite a number of my photos have already been used by other people for various different purposes (blogs posts, articles, even album covers), including some of the "bigger" sites such as the Wall Street Journal Blog or Cult of Mac...

Here's the list of places I know of where my photos are used. Please leave a comment if you spot more of them in the wild. I intend to keep this list updated as more of my photos appear elsewhere.

(Oh, and I have no idea why people seem to be so obsessed with my "Sugar" photo...)

Sugar

Sugar


Clock

Clock


Autumn Leaf

Autumn Leaf


Scissors

Scrissors


Soccer World Championship 2006

Soccer World Championship 2006


Organized

Organized


Dandelion

Dandelion II


Intel Celeron CPU

Intel Celeron CPU


Smoke

Smoke


Sun and trees

Sun and Trees


POSIX.1g

Posix.1g


Easter eggs

Easter eggs


Use more bandwidth

More Bandwidth


Webcam

Webcam


Two Flowers

Two Flowers

Updated Miro (previously Democracy Player) packages in Debian unstable

Miro screenshot

FYI, my new Miro packages (formerly known as Democracy Player) have now reached unstable.

After lots of ugly, ugly trouble with even getting a successful build (boost/python/dbus related, you don't want to know) the packages are back in shape now, with tons of fixed (or no longer reproducible) bugs and lots of upstream impovements and new features.

If you reported a bug against Democracy Player, please try the latest Miro package and check if it still occurs, thanks!

The upgrade should be seamless, your existing config and videos will be migrated from ~/.democracyplayer to ~/.miro automatically upon the first start of Miro.

Some of the new/fixed things in this release include:

  • HTTP proxy support (uses the GNOME proxy settings, use gconf-editor to change them).
  • Flash videos now play fine (non-jerky) and with sound!
  • You can search various video sites (Youtube, Google video, etc.) online, and even save searches as channels.
  • You can export your channel list into an OPML file (and also import OPML files, of course). I've been waiting for this for a very long time (it's a good way to backup your channel list, or move it to another machine)...
  • Lots and lots of bugfixes and small enhancements, as usual.

/media vs. /mnt

Martin, you should enable comments in your blog instead of forcing me to resort to email or spamming Planet Debian :)

Seriously though, while I know that the FHS recommends /media as a mount point for removable media (and it sure makes sense for Debian as a whole to use that), one of the first things I do on my own boxes upon a fresh install is "rmdir /media /cdrom /floppy /initrd". I don't want to have yet another directory cluttering my root, and I find /mnt is perfectly fine for any mount points, especially since I don't really care whether I mount removable media or not. For example, I have /mnt/cdrom, /mnt/usbstick, /mnt/win, /mnt/hda1, /mnt/hda2, ..., /mnt/ipod etc. etc.

kitty, a Qt/KDE based RSS podcast and video aggregator, is now in unstable

kitty screenshot

As mentioned earlier, I wanted to package the KDE videoblog client kitty for Debian. I finally found the time to really do it, and the package has entered Debian unstable a few days ago. The first bug has already been reported (sigh), but I'm working on it.

kitty got even mentioned in Debian Weekly News (w00t!)

Revver - Got video? Get paid!

Hm, more food for my video iPod which hasn't arrived yet.

Revver ("a Flickr for video") is a new video publishing community site which allows you to upload, share, watch, and tag videos for free. You need a special upload tool for uploading videos (there's a Windows version, a MacOS X version, and a Java version which probably works on Linux).

They intend to give the creators of the videos some money by attaching a clickable advertisement frame (the so-called RevTag™) at the end of each video. Everytime a viewer clicks the ad, the video creator gets some money. While this might be a great idea, it still leaves me with a strange feeling (the ad is not on a webpage, it's appended to the video itself!)...

Some noteworthy details:

  • They currently have a size limit of 100 MB per video.
  • They don't censor the videos except for obvious copyright violations (porn yes, illegal stuff no).
  • You get 50% of the money and Revver gets the other 50%.
  • You need a PayPal account to get the money.
  • "Your videos stay on Revver for as long as they generate a reasonable amount of revenue" (no unlimited hosting, it seems).
  • The videos are automatically put into iTunes and formatted to work with the video iPod.
  • All videos are automatically converted into the mov format.
  • The default license for the videos is the Creative Commons ShareAlike license (you can probably choose others, I didn't check).

More information is in their first blog post, and in the FAQ.

A final quote from the blog post:

It’s a new game, we’re thrilled to be in it, and we tip our hats bigtime to the Ourmedia crew, the YouTube crew, the Participatory Culture crew, the Creative Commons crew, and all the other crews that came before us.

All in all this looks quite promising, and I'm curious how it will develp and grow...

(via Boing Boing)

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