book

Linux Kernel in a Nutshell - Creative Commons licensed O'Reilly book by Greg Kroah-Hartman

Greg Kroah-Hartman's new book Linux Kernel in a Nutshell is now available in stores, as well as for download on his website.

To quote O'Reilly:

Written by a leading developer and maintainer of the Linux kernel, Linux Kernel in a Nutshell is a comprehensive overview of kernel configuration and building, a critical task for Linux users and administrators.

No distribution can provide a Linux kernel that meets all users' needs. Computers big and small have special requirements that require reconfiguring and rebuilding the kernel. Whether you are trying to get sound, wireless support, and power management working on a laptop or incorporating enterprise features such as logical volume management on a large server, you can benefit from the insights in this book.

Linux Kernel in a Nutshell covers the entire range of kernel tasks, starting with downloading the source and making sure that the kernel is in sync with the versions of the tools you need. In addition to configuration and installation steps, the book offers reference material and discussions of related topics such as control of kernel options at runtime.

A key benefit of the book is a chapter on determining exactly what drivers are needed for your hardware. Also included are recipes that list what you need to do to accomplish a wide range of popular tasks.

It's yet another great book licensed under a Creative Commons license. It's good to see that more and more books are now being freely licensed...

SELinux by Example - Using Security Enhanced Linux

SELinux by Example

Recently in my (physical) mailbox: SELinux by Example by Frank Mayer, Karl MacMillan, David Caplan. The most recent and up-to-date book about SELinux I know about, written by some of the most involved and knowledgeable people in the field.

From what I've read until now it seems to be a really in-depth and easy to understand introduction, and what's more important, it covers the practical aspects of how you use, configure, and administer SELinux in real deployed systems.

This should make an interesting read...

Technical Editor of a German Drupal book

Recently, I've had the pleasure to try out something new - reviewing a book before it is published.

I have been acting as technical editor/reviewer (or whatever that's called in English) for the first German book about Drupal, written by Hagen Graf: "Drupal: Community-Websites entwickeln und verwalten mit dem Open Source-CMS". The book covers the Drupal 4.7-beta series and is a good introduction to Drupal and it's concepts. It's a nice book for people who want to learn more about creating websites with Drupal. More details in this post over at drupal.org.

Reviewing books is a lot of fun - I might do that more often in future ;)

Forensic Discovery - a (free) book by Wietse Venema and Dan Farmer about forensic techniques for gathering digital evidence

I accidentally stumbled over this today: the book Forensic Discovery, written by two security gurus — Wietse Venema and Dan Farmer - has been published by Addison-Wesley.

Which is nice and all, but even nicer is the fact that the book is freely available for online reading. There's also a ZIP-file, if you want to get the whole thing.

This should make for some interesting reading during the next few weeks...

How to Survive a Robot Uprising

Daniel H. Wilson, Ph.D. from the Robotics Institute of Carnegie Mellon University, has written a book about HOW TO SURVIVE A ROBOT UPRISING.

Bruce Schneier asked for more suggestions, and he received. Plenty.

(via Bruce Schneier)

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